Bruins, Blackhawks share the wealth: NHL players who have starred for both teams

 

 
 
 
 
BOBBY ORR: Synonymous with Boston Bruins hockey, but of course he was ultimately ‘exiled’ to Chicago, where he finished his injury-ravaged NHL career in a brief 26 games over three years.
 
 

BOBBY ORR: Synonymous with Boston Bruins hockey, but of course he was ultimately ‘exiled’ to Chicago, where he finished his injury-ravaged NHL career in a brief 26 games over three years.

Photograph by: Hockey Hall of Fame, .

They may have had surprisingly few encounters in the NHL playoffs (six series in all, the last one coming in 1978) for Original Six franchises, but the Boston Bruins and Chicago Blackhawks have shared some fairly good players over the decades.

We may not have reached ALL THE WAY back to these iconic franchises’ origins — the Bruins joined the NHL in 1924, the “Black Hawks” in 1926 — but here are some notable and not so remarkable players who have worn both storied jerseys.

You can click here for photos of players and their stories or go to the photos tab on this story and click on "next" to see these players.

 
 
 
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BOBBY ORR: Synonymous with Boston Bruins hockey, but of course he was ultimately ‘exiled’ to Chicago, where he finished his injury-ravaged NHL career in a brief 26 games over three years.
 

BOBBY ORR: Synonymous with Boston Bruins hockey, but of course he was ultimately ‘exiled’ to Chicago, where he finished his injury-ravaged NHL career in a brief 26 games over three years.

Photograph by: Hockey Hall of Fame, .

 
BOBBY ORR: Synonymous with Boston Bruins hockey, but of course he was ultimately ‘exiled’ to Chicago, where he finished his injury-ravaged NHL career in a brief 26 games over three years.
Now THIS is how Boston Bruins fans like to think of the dynamic duo: Bobby Orr (left) the generator and Phil Esposito (right) the finisher, during the glory days of the Bruins in the early 1970s.
PHIL ESPOSITO: Well before he won five Art Ross trophies as the NHL's leading scorer with the Boston Bruins, 'Espo' was centring Bobby Hull with the Chicago Blackhawks, and essentially playing second fiddle (centre-wise) to Stan Mikita. Then came the blockbuster summer trade of 1967, when the Hawks sent Espositio, Ken Hodge and Fred Stanfield to the Bruins in exchange for centre Pit Martin, defenceman Gilles Marotte and goalie Jack Norris. Let's just say the Bruins won that trade, hands down.
KEN HODGE (left) with linemate PHIL ESPOSITO: Hodge started in the Chicago Blackhawks organization, playing two full seasons in the Windy City. He was then part of the blockbuster trade that sent Esposito to the Bruins in the summer of 1967. Hodge would be the Bruins' top right-winger during that team's glory years in the early 1970s, when they won two Stanley Cups, and scored 50 goals once and had two 40-goal seasons playing with Esposito at centre and Wayne Cashman on left wing.
FRED STANFIELD: The third player in the infamous Phil Esposito trade in 1967 from the Chicago Blackhawks to the Boston Bruins, Stanfield would be a steady second-line centre, behind Esposito and ahead of checker Derek Sanderson, on the Bruins teams that won two Stanley Cups in the early 1970s. Stanfield came up in the Hawks organization and played parts of three seasons there.
PIT MARTIN: A small, shifty, offensive centre, Martin went to the Chicago Blackhawks from the Boston Bruins in the infamous Phil Esposito trade in 1967. Martin supplied a one-two offensive punch at centre (with Stan Mikita) in the Hawks’ two Stanley Cup Final runs of the early 1970s.
GILLES MAROTTE: Known as 'Captain Crunch' on defence, Marotte was was considered a prime pickup by the Chicago Blackhawks when he was obtained from the Boston Bruins as part of the Phil Esposito trade in 1967. Marotte could hit, but he didn't stick in Chicago for long.
AL SECORD: This rugged, gloves-dropping left-winger is best known for both scoring and protecting his diminutive linemate, Denis Savard, while with the Chicago Blackhawks in the 1980s. But Secord was originally a Boston Bruin, drafted in the first round no less by the rugged B's in 1978.
PAUL COFFEY: We don't think of this Hockey Hall of Famer as either a Boston Bruin or a Chicago Blackhawk, having spent his best years blazing up the ice with the puck with the Wayne Gretzky-led Edmonton Oilers and the Mario Lemieux-led Pittsburgh Penguins. But Coffey got around late in his NHL career, and spent 10 games in early 1998-99 with the Blackhawks and then 18 games in 2000-01 with the Bruins.
PAT STAPLETON: A solid, two-way defenceman who captained the Chicago Blackhawks by the early 1970s as well as played for Team Canada in the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union, Stapleton started his NHL career playing 69 games in 1961-62 for the Bruins. By 1965 he was a Chicago Blackhawk.
BOBBY SCHMAUTZ: A tough little winger with a scorer’s touch, Schmautz played parts of two seasons with the Chicago Blackhawks in the late 1960s and, after a productive stint (38 goals in 1972-73) with the Vancouver Canucks, played a supporting role on the physical, Don Cherry-coached Boston Bruins teams of the late 1970s.
DOUG MOHNS: For a player who never got a lot of laurels during his career, Mohns had a remarkably long tenure as a National Hockey League player: 22 seasons in fact. Mohns was a Boston Bruin from 1953 through 1964, then became a Chicago Blackhawks mainstay — first on defence, then as a forward, from 1964 through 1971. In this photo Mohns chases Montreal Canadien Jacques Laperriere behind the net, and look who's behind them! That's Phil Espositio as a Blackhawk, a couple of years before he would be traded to the Bruins.
ROY CONACHER: This Hockey Hall of Famer was a Boston Bruin from 1938 to 1942, winning two Stanley Cups, then returned to the Bruins immediately after the Second World War in 1945-46. Conachaer ended his NHL career with the Chicago Blackhawks (or 'Black Hawks,' as they were then known) from 1947-48 to 1951-52, winning the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL's leading scorer in 1948-49.
MIKE O'CONNELL: This defenceman was a Chicago Blackhawk from 1978 to 1981, then was traded to the Boston Bruins, where he played until 1986. O'Connell would have a more notable career in the executive suite, though, as general manager of the Bruins from 2000 to 2006.
ALEXEI ZHAMNOV: Many of this centre's best years were spent in Chicago with the Blackhawks from 1996 to 2004, but Zhamnov did have a 24-game cup of coffee with the Boston Bruins in 2005-06 to end his NHL career.
ERIC WEINRICH: This steady defenceman was a Chicago Blackhawk from 1993 to 1998, and while he did do time with several other teams during his 16-season career in the NHL, Weinrich was a Boston Bruin for 22 games in 2001.
JEFF HACKETT: This 14 NHL-season goaltender spent six years — 1993 to 1999 — with the Chicago Blackhawks, but he also had an 18-game stint in 2003 with the Boston Bruins.
ROBERT LANG: A scorer over nearly 15 NHL seasons, Lang started with three games for the Boston Bruins in 1997 and played a full 2007-08 season for the Chicago Blackhawks.
STEPHANE QUINTAL: The Boston Bruins' first-round draft pick in 1987, the big blueliner played in parts of four seasons with the B’s at the start of his career (shuttling back and forth to the minors). He would play the 2000-01 season for the Chicago Blackhawks, but spent much of his career with the Montreal Canadiens.
JOHNNY McKENZIE: ‘Pie’ was the truculent type, breaking in with the Chicago Blackhawks organization at the NHL level in 1958, playing through the mid-1960s, bouncing up and down from the minors. He became a Boston Bruin in 1965, and was a solid, agitating winger through 1972, winning two Stanley Cups for the Bruins.
ED JOHNSTON: Johnston made his mark with the Boston Bruins in net from 1962 through 1973, sharing the goaltending duties with Gerry Cheevers when the Bruins won two Stanley Cups. At the end of his 16-season career, he played four games with the Blackhawks in 1977-78. Johnston would leave at least as big a mark on the game, though, as the NHL general manager in Pittsburgh who drafted Mario Lemieux in 1984.
ARMAND 'BEP' GUIDOLIN: The youngest-ever National Hockey League player at age 16 when he skated with the Bruins in 1942-43, played parts of four seasons in Boston bracketed around the Second World War. Later skated for the Chicago Blackhawks from 1948 through 1952. Much later, Guidolin coached the Bruins to the 1973-74 Stanley Cup Final.
PHIL MALONEY: Pictured here as a player with the WHL's Vancouver Canucks, circa 1960s. Maloney was a long-time minor leaguer player and coach, perhaps better known as the fourth head coach in Vancouver Canucks history from 1974 to 1977. He played two seasons in Boston with the Boston Bruins early in his career (1949 through 1951), then years later played 21 games in 1959-60 for the Chicago Blackhawks.
VIC STASIUK (left) and BRONCO HORVATH: The pair were two-thirds of the Uke Line (as in Ukranian) for the Boston Bruins in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Horvath, a star centre for four seasons in Boston, played the 1961-62 season for the Chicago Blackhawks. Stasiuk, meanwhile, started his NHL career with the Blackhawks over parts of two seasons (1949-50 and 1950-51) playing a total of 37 games. After Stanley Cup success on the mighty Detroit Red Wings teams of the early 1950s, Stasiuk went on to play for the Bruins from 1955-56 to 1960-61. He later served one season (1972-73) as the second head coach in the Vancouver Canucks NHL franchise history.
MURRAY COSTELLO: When hockey people think of Costello, it's not as a National Hockey League player. But he did break into the NHL with the Chicago Blackhawks in 1953, playing 40 games. Costello then played the 1954-55 season and the first part of the 1955-56 seasons for the Bruins. He is best known, though, in later years as president of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, then Hockey Canada.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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