Gallery: What are the chances these guys will be back with the Canucks next season?

 

We estimate the chances of each player's return, on a percentage scale of 1 to 100, to give you an idea how much the team will change.

 
 
 
 
<div id="page1">Andrew Alberts: His deal, which paid him $1.225 million for this season, is up and the 31-year-old is an unrestricted free agent. Vancouver will probably look younger to fill that spot.</div>
 

Andrew Alberts: His deal, which paid him $1.225 million for this season, is up and the 31-year-old is an unrestricted free agent. Vancouver will probably look younger to fill that spot.

Photograph by: File photo, The Province

 
<div id="page1">Andrew Alberts: His deal, which paid him $1.225 million for this season, is up and the 31-year-old is an unrestricted free agent. Vancouver will probably look younger to fill that spot.</div>
Keith Ballard: Didn&#8217;t get on ice in playoffs, despite being fourth-highest-paid D-man, at $4.2 million per. Ballard, 30, never meshed with coaching staff, looks like compliance buyout candidate if not somehow dealt. Signed through 2014-15.
Cam Barker: The Canucks took a flyer on the one-time No. 3 overall draft pick and his $700,000 contract is up, leaving him an unrestricted free agent. They&#8217;ll look for someone other than the 27-year-old for this spot.
Kevin Bieksa: Has no-trade clause, signed through 2015-16. Bieksa, 31, is one of the leaders, one of the harder guys in the group to play against.
David Booth: It would take some interesting number-crunching to see Booth and his $4.25 million cap hit return next season. Injuries immolated his season: 12 games, one empty-net goal and some interesting Tweets.
Alex Burrows: Burrows is one of the few Canucks core players who doesn&#8217;t have a no-trade clause in his contract (at least not until July), so he could be moved to change the mix of the team. Such a trade would be a big gamble, considering his chemistry with the Sedins, excellent penalty killing and the emotion he brings.
Frank Corrado: The 20-year-old provided an adrenalins boost to the defence when he got called up late in the year, but Vancouver could easily want him to start next season in the minors to get seasoning. He&#8217;s a $599, 444 hit next season.
Andrew Ebbett: The Canucks brought the versatile Ebbett back after the injury-riddled previous season, but lack of size will work against the 30-year-old.
Alex Edler: Edler doesn&#8217;t have a no-trade on his current deal, which pays him $3.25 million per season, but the six-year extension that kicks in next season worth $5 million a campaign does, so there&#8217;s a window here to move the 27-year-old if you&#8217;re looking to really change up your core.
Jason Garrison: Garrison, 28, started slowly but was one of the team&#8217;s best players down the stretch. Like Bieksa, makes $4.6 annually and has a no-trade clause. Signed through 2017-18.
Dan Hamhuis: Quiet leader, solid, steady type. Role model. Hamhuis, 30, has no-trade clause on his $4.5-million annual. Signed through 2015-16.
Jannik Hansen: Hansen is a glue player because he&#8217;s among the team&#8217;s hardest workers and most versatile players. Plus, he&#8217;s on a very cap-friendly $1.35 million deal.
Chris Higgins: Higgins, 29, just re-signed with the team for four more years, so they obviously like him, but he&#8217;s now gone pointless in two consecutive playoffs. Hard work and versatility make him an attractive keeper.
Zack Kassian: Kassian had a very inconsistent year, but is still just 22. The Canucks believe he has a huge upside &#8212; and, of course, he was the return in the Cody Hodgson swap &#8212; so he&#8217;s untouchable.
Ryan Kesler: It would be a trade &#8212; Kesler, 28, would have to waive his no-trade clause &#8212; of seismic proportions to move him out of Vancouver. And, of course, you&#8217;d be trading away what you actually need more of. Without question, it would bring plenty of assets, but a disaster if Kesler returns to 2011 form.
Maxim Lapierre: Lapierre plays a straight-ahead game and is a good fit at fourth-line centre. The expectation is the Canucks re-sign the pending UFA.
Roberto Luongo: Logic says he&#8217;s slam-dunk gone, but logic said that at this point last year. Then just before training camp. Then at the trade deadline. The Canucks will likely have to pay some of the 34-year-old&#8217;s contract in a deal. He&#8217;s a $5.33-million cap hit through 2021-22.
Steve Pinizzotto: Getting Pinizzotto onto their NHL roster in March effectively cost the Canucks Aaron Volpatti, who was claimed by the Capitals off waivers and then re-signed. The pending UFA had a great first NHL shift but was scratched down the stretch.
Mason Raymond: Raymond scored a goal in the Canucks final playoff game, but he&#8217;d had just one in 14 games before that. He&#8217;s a pending UFA, and though he had a better statistical year than the year before, we&#8217;re expecting the team lets him walk.
Derek Roy: The pending UFA was acquired at the trade deadline to add secondary scoring. That happened in stretches in the regular season, but failed miserably in the playoffs. The Canucks need bigger, more physical players, and the 5-foot-9 Roy isn&#8217;t the answer.
Cory Schneider: There&#8217;s a school of thought out that the Canucks would be better off dealing Schneider, but his age (27) and his contract ($4 million annually, through 2014-15) suggest otherwise.
Daniel Sedin: Henrik, the captain, and Daniel, an alternate, are huge parts of the Canucks&#8217; leadership group, are the team&#8217;s top forwards and its perpetual scoring leaders. But both will be 33 next September and enter the final year of their contract. A year from now, the percentage might be very different.
Henrik Sedin: Henrik, the captain, and Daniel, an alternate, are huge parts of the Canucks&#8217; leadership group, are the team&#8217;s top forwards and its perpetual scoring leaders. But both will be 33 next September and enter the final year of their contract. A year from now, the percentage might be very different.
Tom Sestito: The 6-foot-5, 230-pounder is tough as nails and completely understands his role. But if the Canucks look to upgrade the skill on the fourth line, the pending RFA may be a casualty.
Chris Tanev: The 23-year-old&#8217;s entry-level deal, worth $900,000 annually, is up, making him a restricted free agent. He&#8217;s a No. 5 guy in the current format. Could he be enticed away by promises of top-four ice time elsewhere?
Dale Weise: Weise moved his game forward in his sophomore NHL season and became a regular penalty killer along with fourth-line duties. Unless the Canucks radically retool their bottom six, the pending RFA looks safe.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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