Hickey on Hockey Notebook: Rangers’ Moore a fitting hero

 

 
 
 
 
Dominic Moore, who scored the series-winning goal on Thursday night for the Rangers, returned to hockey this season after taking more than a year off to be with his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 after a nine-month battle with a rare form of cancer.
 

Dominic Moore, who scored the series-winning goal on Thursday night for the Rangers, returned to hockey this season after taking more than a year off to be with his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 after a nine-month battle with a rare form of cancer.

Photograph by: Bruce Bennett, Getty Images

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Moore a fitting hero for Rangers

There were two good things about the goal that eliminated the Canadiens from the playoffs — it was a clean goal and not one of the crazy bounces that too often decide close games, and it was scored by Dominic Moore. The New York Rangers took advantage of a tired group of Canadiens at the end of a long shift to score the only goal in their 1-0 Game 6 victory in the Eastern Conference final. Ryan McDonagh, who will forever be known as the one who got away in Montreal, worked the puck down low to Brian Boyle and he found Moore alone in front of the net. It was a golden moment for the 33-year-old Moore, who returned to hockey this season after taking more than a year off to be with his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 after a nine-month battle with a rare form of cancer. Moore is the odds-on favourite to win the Bill Masterton Trophy, which goes to the player who exhibits sportsmanship, perseverance and dedication to hockey. The Harvard graduate has played for nine different NHL teams, including the Canadiens. Some players move around because they fall short of expectations, but Moore is different. His work ethic and character have made him a valuable commodity as teams look for help at the trade deadline. This year marked only the third time in Moore’s career that he spent an entire season with one team because the Rangers knew they had the kind of gritty player built for the playoffs.

Habs drop in draft order

Trevor Timmins is justifiably proud of the Canadiens’ showing in these playoffs, but the team has made his job a tad more difficult heading into the next month’s NHL draft. Timmins drafted 10 of the players on the current Canadiens roster, including such stalwarts as Max Pacioretty, Lars Eller, Alex Galchenyuk, Brendan Gallagher, P.K. Subban and Carey Price. He also drafted the Rangers’ Ryan McDonagh and argued against the trade that sent the defenceman to New York. If the Canadiens had gone out in one of the first two rounds of the playoffs, they would have drafted between No. 20 and No. 23. They are now looking at a spot in the final four selections of the first round.

Rangers fans worried about bad karma

You would think Rangers fans would welcome any and all support, but some fans are upset because the team has been embraced by New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan and defensive-end Muhammad Wilkerson. The fans are asking the Jets’ duo to stay away from the Rangers because the National Football League team been dismal in recent years and fans are afraid the bad karma will rub off on the hockey team.

A new event for NHL skills competition?

Here’s an idea for an addition to the skills competition at the NHL All-Star Game: a water-bottle squirting competition. The latest chapter in the NHL’s Watergate involved Chicago Blackhawks goaltender Corey Crawford, who allegedly squirted a fan during Game 4 of the Chicago-Los Angeles series. TMZ.com, which usually concerns itself with stalking celebrities, was the first to report that 27-year-old Clark Wang filed a battery charge against Crawford, claiming he suffered an eye irritation after being squirted by the pride of Châteauguay. The Los Angeles Police Department confirmed it was investigating the incident, but said it had a low priority. One reason why the police aren’t taking this too seriously is because Wang seems to be a loose cannon. He was ejected from the L.A. Staples Center for taunting Chicago players.

phickey@montrealgazette.com

Twitter: zababes1

 
 
 
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Dominic Moore, who scored the series-winning goal on Thursday night for the Rangers, returned to hockey this season after taking more than a year off to be with his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 after a nine-month battle with a rare form of cancer.
 

Dominic Moore, who scored the series-winning goal on Thursday night for the Rangers, returned to hockey this season after taking more than a year off to be with his wife, Katie, who died in January 2013 after a nine-month battle with a rare form of cancer.

Photograph by: Bruce Bennett, Getty Images

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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